Frequently Asked Questions

We hope this website has helped you gain an understanding of the project. If you have some specific points you wish to ask about, these frequently asked questions should help. Alternatively, please email info@northlondonheatandpower.london or call 0208 489 3940.

The feedback form asks questions on a number of key issues. We would recommend you read our Consultation booklet as this provides detailed information relating to each of the questions.

We have reviewed all of the feedback we received during both phases of the consultation and have produced a summary of the consultation report.

 

Tell me more about the project

What is the North London Heat and Power Project?

The North London Heat and Power Project is North London Waste Authority’s proposal to build an Energy Recovery Facility with associated buildings and works. It will replace the existing plant at the Edmonton EcoPark by around 2025 so we can continue to turn waste into energy – heat and power. The existing plant is expected to reach the end of its operational life around 2025.

The replacement facility would generate over 50 megawatts of electricity, which means that in planning terms it is classified as a Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project. As a result, the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy decided whether we should be granted consent to build it, following examination of our proposals.

Our two planned phases of consultation have finished. The first took place between 28 November 2014 and 27 January 2015 and was to collect your thoughts before we shaped our plans, and the second, from 18 May to 30 June 2015, where we shared the detail.

The Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has now granted a Development Consent Order (DCO) for us to build a replacement energy recovery facility, and associated development, at the Edmonton EcoPark.

What is North London Waste Authority?

North London Waste Authority (NLWA) arranges the disposal, recycling and composting of waste collected by the seven London boroughs of Barnet, Camden, Enfield, Hackney, Haringey, Islington and Waltham Forest.

Working with local councils, we encourage and promote the three messages of reduce, reuse and recycle through waste prevention work in the community.

NLWA runs campaigns across north London to help achieve a 50 per cent recycling target by 2020, including the Wise Up To Waste campaign, as reducing waste is our main priority.

Waste that we cannot recycle still needs to be disposed of responsibly. We do this by sending it to our existing Energy from Waste plant at the Edmonton EcoPark or to landfill outside of north London. LondonWaste Ltd (LWL) operates the existing plant. LWL is wholly owned by NLWA.

Find out more at our website  www.nlwa.gov.uk

What is the Edmonton EcoPark?

The Edmonton EcoPark is a site of about 38 acres which is used for waste management and is protected by planning policies as a waste site.  It is owned and managed by LondonWaste Ltd, North London Waste Authority's wholly owned company, which operates the existing Energy from Waste facility under a contract.

Current waste management activities on the site include the Energy from Waste facility, an in-vessel composting facility for organic waste and a bulky waste handling facility.  

For further details, see LondonWaste’s website www.londonwaste.co.uk. 

You can see the location of the site here

Why do you need to replace the existing Edmonton Energy from Waste facility?

The existing plant has served north London well for almost 45 years and has diverted more than 21 million tonnes of the waste which would have otherwise gone to landfill. 

It’s had multi-million pound investments over the decades but it is likely to reach the end of its useful life in around 10 years. 

Waste forecasts for the future show that the amount of waste we create will increase in north London. We also need to divert as much waste as possible away from landfill. The proposed facility would need to manage up to 700,000 tonnes a year at a peak by 2051, even if we reach our 50 per cent household waste recycling target. We expect to send virtually no waste to landfill. 

The replacement facility would be built using today’s most advanced and proven technology. It would be one of the most effective of its kind by current standards and have even better emission controls than the existing plant.

Why are you starting this project now?

To ensure a replacement facility is built and up-and-running by 2025, we have to start planning now. We have been granted a development consent order (DCO) by the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy to build a replacement energy recovery facility, and associated development at the Edmonton EcoPark.

We will now consider the details of the consent and begin the process of developing a procurement strategy. We anticipate starting construction works in 2019 and expect to move operations to the replacement facility from 2025 to 2027.

Why the site at the EcoPark?

The EcoPark is well placed to continue to provide a sustainable solution for dealing with waste.  Enfield Council’s Supplementary Planning Document which focuses on the site supports the decommissioning of the existing plant at Edmonton EcoPark and the continued use of the site for waste management. The Supplementary Planning Document also promotes the on-going use of the site to manage waste and generate heat and power.

The Mayor of London’s policies protect existing waste sites such as the EcoPark and promote the management of London’s waste within its boundaries as well as the generation of energy in London.

What was the feedback from the first phase of consultation?

The feedback we have received played an essential part in shaping our plans for the replacement facility. The topics you commented on covered many areas including:

• the need for the project

• the design and appearance of the replacement

facility and chimney stack

• landscaping

• environment

• the cooling system

• traffic and transport

• community benefits

• the consultation process itself.

At the public exhibitions, attendees asked a range of interesting questions including some about the existing plant. For example, we have been asked about the existing composting centre to the north of the Energy from Waste plant. We can confirm that there are no plans for a composting centre in the Development Consent Order.

You also asked about the cooling system. You said you would welcome any increased efficiency and you did understand that the plume was only water vapour.

About my waste

What currently happens to my waste?

Waste from households in north London is collected by the borough councils (the waste collection authorities). Recycling is delivered either directly or dropped off then delivered in larger vehicles to a materials recycling facility where it is sorted before being passed on to a reprocessor such as a paper mill. North London’s recycling either goes to a recycling facility in Bow in east London or to a recycling facility in Edmonton for sorting. Garden and kitchen waste from six of the boroughs is delivered directly to a composting plant at the Edmonton EcoPark. The composting facility is run by LondonWaste Ltd, which is a company wholly owned by NLWA. Enfield’s garden and kitchen waste is delivered elsewhere.

Household waste that isn’t recycled or composted is delivered to the Energy from Waste facility at the Edmonton EcoPark, where it is used to generate electricity, enough to power 72,000 homes.
Any waste that cannot be processed in the Energy from Waste facility is sent to landfill sites outside of London.

In 2012/13 households in north London achieved a re-use, recycling and composting rate of approximately 32%.

Working with local councils, we encourage and promote the three messages of reduce, re-use and recycle through waste prevention work in the community.  By 2020, we want at least half of all our waste to be recycled.

For more information about what happens to recycling visit 
wiseuptowaste.org.uk/recycle-more/what-happens  

For more information on what happens to the kitchen and garden and residual waste, visit londonwaste.co.uk

Find out more about LondonWaste Ltd (LWL)

Why can’t we just send waste to landfill?

Landfill isn’t a long-term solution because:

  • It produces methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas.  

  • Landfill sites are almost always outside London

  • Taxation makes it very expensive

Landfill is the least preferable option for managing waste from an environmental point of view and in terms in cost.  All the landfill sites that North London Waste Authority uses are outside of London so there is a cost to transporting the waste to landfill for disposal.  In addition a tax of £82.60 per tonne has to be paid on every tonne of waste that is sent to landfill and is likely to continue to rise.

As waste decomposes in a landfill site it generates landfill gas – a mixture of methane, carbon dioxide and water vapour.  Methane is around 28 times more powerful as a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide over a 100 year period.

So by putting a tax on waste to landfill the Government aims to make it the least attractive option for local authorities, businesses and any other producers of waste when they are considering how to manage waste. North London Waste Authority and the seven north London boroughs it serves therefore want to minimise the use of landfill now and in the future.

For more information on landfill, please click here

Why is it important to reduce, reuse and recycle?

We have a legal duty to dispose of the waste but supporting ways of reducing, reusing and recycling waste remains high priority.

If we reduce the amount that we produce in the first place and reuse things again, we avoid the industrial processes involved in recycling and the costs associated with them and reduce our carbon footprint. It is therefore important to reduce and reuse waste from both a cost and environmental point of view. If waste cannot be reduced or reused then recycling is a fantastic way to turn rubbish into something useful again. Recycling saves money compared to disposal and is also better for the environment. Recycling helps to ensure that materials such as paper, card, glass and metal can be turned into new products, reducing the need for virgin materials and conserving the planet’s resources. As a result waste prevention, preparing material that was going to be waste for re-use and recycling are the top priorities for waste management strategies across Europe

For ways to reduce, reuse and recycle, why not take a look at wiseuptowaste.org.uk.

For more details on the priorities for waste management click here

Will these changes affect how my waste is collected?

No. Your recycling services will not be affected by this project.  You will still be able to recycle through the various services available, such as kerbside collections and Reuse and Recycling Centres.

Tell me about the proposals

What are you proposing to build?

We propose to build:

• an Energy Recovery Facility - this will replace the existing Energy from Waste plant

• a Resource Recovery Facility - this is where bulky waste will be separated for recycling. Anything left over is used as fuel in the Energy Recovery Facility to generate heat and power.  It will also be a recycling centre for the public and businesses from 2021.

• EcoPark House - a visitors’ centre where people can find out more about recycling, waste, heat and power.

Where will the buildings be positioned?

The North London Heat and Power Project would be made up of three elements - the Energy Recovery Facility, the Resource Recovery Facility, including a Reuse and Recycling Centre and EcoPark House. The project also includes associated plant, landscaping and engineering works.

This design:

• Provides space for landscaping the EcoPark

• Ensures the existing plant can operate up until the replacement is operational

• Provides space for a visitors’ centre in EcoPark House near the River Lee Navigation

• Delivers the facilities required to manage north London’s waste

• Creates new site access points.


Many of the existing facilities currently in the north will be relocated and housed inside a new Resource Recovery Facility in the South.  This building will also feature a new Reuse and Recycling Centre for the public.  Composting will take place off site.

On the eastern edge, along the river, the new EcoPark House will be home to a visitors' centre where people can learn more about waste, heat and power.

Once the Energy Recovery Facility is fully up and running – around 2025 – we’ll take down the old one.

You can view a video of what the building will look like and where they will be positioned on our Project Page

What will the Energy Recovery Facility look like?

The Energy Recovery Facility has a ‘shrink wrap’ design to keep height and shape to a minimum. It has ‘steps’ down towards the Lee Valley Regional Park to break up the building.

We propose different materials for different parts of the facility to make the building better fit the setting. Using colours means we can add depth and further reduce the perceived scale of the building.

There are pictures of what the facility could look like in our consultation booklet.  

You can also view a video of what the building will look like and where they will positioned on our project page

Tell me about the chimney stack?

In our first phase of consultation we asked for your comments on the chimney stack design. We asked if the stack should be one single chimney or twin independent flues. We also asked if it should be attached to or alongside the replacement facility. You had different thoughts about the external appearance, but most of you commenting thought that it should be designed to be as unobtrusive as possible. Our design proposal aims to achieve that.

We propose that the chimney stack is alongside, is rectangular in shape and is made of materials that help it fade into the background.

There is more information, including pictures and maps in our consultation booklet.

Tell me about the Resource Recovery Facility

The Resource Recovery Facility will accommodate the activities currently carried out at the north of the site (except composting) and will be split into two sections. One side will be for bulky waste management where items brought in on borough collection trucks will be checked to see if materials can be recycled. Waste left over will be transferred to the Energy Recovery Facility. The other side will be a new Reuse and Recycling Centre where the public and businesses can bring their recycling and bulky items for disposal from 2021 onwards..


There is more information, including pictures and maps in our consultation booklet.
Tell me about EcoPark House

EcoPark House will be an education and visitors’ centre where people can find out more about recycling resources, heat and power. It will also have office space on the upper floors. We are currently proposing a three-storey building facing onto the River Lee Navigation. It also could have community use and will be home to the Sea Cadets.

The building faces onto the River Lee Navigation.

There is more information, including pictures and maps in our consultation booklet.

Tell me about the plans for landscaping?

We believe our designs connect landscapes and integrate the EcoPark with the Lee Valley Regional Park. We are proposing green and brown roofs on parts of the replacement facility. The design for the EcoPark will also enhance the experience of walking along the tow path of the River Lee Navigation. The designs also reflect the industrial Eley Estate to the west.

For more information, please refer to our 
consultation booklet

What’s happening to the compost operation?

At the public exhibitions, attendees asked about the existing composting centre to the north of the Energy from Waste plant.  We can confirm that there are no plans for a composting centre as part of our Development Consent Order.

Find out more about the current and future arrangement for composting

How will the energy be used?

The current plant provides electricity for 72,000 homes. The replacement facility could provide enough power for around 127,000 homes. We’re also looking at diverting some of the energy to warm local homes and businesses via heat networks.

The Lee Valley Heat Network is a local scheme being promoted by Enfield Council which is aiming to use the available heat from the existing facility and the replacement.

The Lee Valley Heat Network scheme is a separate project and will be managed by Enfield Council. An infographic of how heat networks operate can be found on the Lee Valley Heat Network project website - leevalleyheatnetwork.co.uk

Tell me about the health and environmental impacts?

What emissions control system would the replacement facility have?

The replacement facility will have even better emission control than the existing plant does now. The current plant operates at almost 20% below permitted levels of NOx. The replacement facility will operate at more than 60% below.

There are a number of flue gas cleaning systems we can choose from. We are proposing to use a wet or combined flue gas cleaning system. Both systems:

• are effective at cleaning the flue gas;

• have greater flexibility in handling variations in the flue gas; and

• require fewer chemicals to operate.

One of the key emissions from the energy recovery process is nitrogen oxides (NOx) which contribute to air pollution. There are a number of treatment technologies with the most effective being Selective Catalytic Reduction which achieves emission levels of less than half the permissible level.  For this reason, we are proposing to install a Selective Catalytic Reduction system which will convert NOx into nitrogen and water, both of which are harmless.

The system provides the following advantages:

• it is the most effective technology available for NOx removal;

• its installation within the replacement facility would make it amongst the best performing in Europe; and

• it will help to future proof the facility against changes to emissions limits.

Surrounding local authorities – Enfield, Haringey and Waltham Forest – all carry out air quality monitoring. They have all taken part in the consultation process.

There is more information on emission controls, including diagrams, in our consultation booklet.

Find out more about emissions health and emissions

How will you ensure the local environment is protected?

We recognise the importance of identifying possible benefits and effects of the proposed development and its ongoing operations on the surrounding environment at the Edmonton EcoPark. Therefore, we will reduce impact on the environment and where possible make improvements.

We carried out an Environmental Impact Assessment. This means we investigated how the proposals may benefit or impact the environment during the construction and operation.

Our findings were included in our Environmental Statement, which was submitted as part of the successful application for approval.

 

 

 
 
 

 

What is a cooling system?

Energy is recovered from waste by burning it to heat water, create steam and spin a turbine to generate electricity. As part of this process, a cooling system is required to condense exhaust steam from the turbine back into water. The water is then pumped back to the boiler so it can be reused in the energy recovery process.

We considered an air cooled or a water cooled system during both phases of consultation.

We have chosen an air cooled system and more information can be found in the consultation report summary.

There is more information on the cooling system, including diagrams, in our consultation booklet.

Find out more about the cooling systems

How does each of the cooling systems work?

Energy is recovered from waste by burning it to heat water, create steam and spin a turbine to generate electricity.  As part of this process, a cooling system is required to condense exhaust steam from the turbine back into water.  The water is then pumped back to the boiler so it can be reused in the energy recovery process.

We have chosen an air cooled system for our proposals.

Below are a number of statements about the two systems, to show the differences.

• Water cooling means that more energy will be generated – about 1MW more than the 70MW we expect from the replacement facility

• Air cooling would cost more than water cooling to build – it would add just over one per cent to the cost, based on our expected facility cost of £450million to £500million

• The water cooling system requires more maintenance to clean the water and in some cases can lead to degradation of the surrounding buildings

• The existing Energy from Waste facility uses water cooling which creates a large plume visible on cold days for much of the year. With air cooling there is no plume.

What is a plume?  The plume is the water vapour visible on cold days.

There is more information on the cooling system, including diagrams, in our consultation booklet.

What do you think? We’re asking for your comments on the Cooling System.  Please refer to our consultation booklet and provide us with your feedback.

Tell me about traffic during the construction and demolition phase

When will you be building the replacement facility?

Now that we have been granted a development consent order (DCO) by the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy to build a replacement energy recovery facility, and associated development at the Edmonton EcoPark, we will now consider the details of the consent and begin the process of developing a procurement strategy. We anticipate starting construction works in 2019 and expect to move operations to the replacement facility from 2025 to 2027.


How long will it take to build the replacement facility and demolish the existing one?

We anticipate construction to last three years. The existing plant would not be demolished until the replacement is up and running in around 2025. We would expect the demolition process to take about two years.

How are you going to minimise the impact of the construction?

We will put plans in place to minimise any potential impacts. Our Code of Construction Practice for the proposed facility covers our approach to demolition, material delivery, waste removal plus engineering and construction activities. You can read our Code of Construction Practice here.

The Code will be adopted by our contractors involved in the construction of the proposed replacement facility and demolition of the existing plant.

The existing plant will not be demolished until the replacement is up and running in around 2025. During the demolition phase we estimate that there will be around 6,000 additional vehicle movements over a two year period. This is equivalent to 0.016 per cent of traffic on the North Circular each year.

Tell me about traffic during operation

Daily vehicle movements to and from the Edmonton EcoPark vary depending on the time of day, day of the week and time of year.

Currently all of the waste and other materials entering and leaving the Edmonton EcoPark are delivered by road, through the southern entrance.

In total about 187,000 vehicles enter the site every year. This is about one per cent of the total traffic using the North Circular Road adjacent to the EcoPark site.

We do not envisage a significant change in traffic when our proposed facility is operational. Although we will manage more waste at the site, in total fewer waste management processes would take place at the EcoPark compared to today.

We plan to create a public entrance to the Resource Recovery Facility once operational to the east of the EcoPark adjacent to the North Circular (A406). This means that the public and businesses will be able to recycle their unwanted items at the EcoPark for the first time in 2021. We may continue to use the northern entrance for some operational traffic.

Tell me about traffic during the construction and demolition phase
During construction, a direct access point to Lee Park Way from the construction laydown area would be created. Traffic along Lee Park Way would be limited to small/light vehicles including shuttle buses for employees with a typical capacity of around 30 people.


The main access point on Advent Way would be widened. A northern entrance would be created from Meridian Way. This would be used for the construction of the replacement facility and the demolition of the existing facility.

We are proposing to create a temporary laydown area, where construction materials would be delivered before being used to build the project. This would be located on the eastern side of the River Lee Navigation on an area of land belonging to Thames Water.

Construction traffic would predominantly be kept away from the residential areas, but trips would be made along Meridian Way (A1055) to access the site from Deephams Farm Road via Ardra Road. This traffic would pass the residential area to the north of Montagu Recreation Ground.

For further information, including a map, please refer to our consultation booklet

Tell me about the costs?

How much will this project cost?
We have now been granted a development consent order (DCO) to build the project. We anticipate the Energy Recovery Facility itself will cost in the region of £500 million at today’s prices. We will be providing updates throughout the project as information becomes available.
Who will pay for the project?

North London Waste Authority has a responsibility for the disposal of waste collected by the seven north London boroughs.  The disposal of this waste is paid for through the council tax in north London.  The cost of this project would be paid for by council tax.  It would be our continued intention to keep any increase in costs as low as possible.

What about the community benefits?

Tell me about the visitor centre

We are proposing to build a Visitors’ Centre called EcoPark House. From here, we will continue to offer pre-arranged EcoPark tours, including a safe and interesting route around the site and give everyone a chance to see how we will generate heat and power from waste left over after recycling.

We are also proposing to relocate the Sea Cadets into EcoPark House, once the project is built. The Sea Cadets currently meet at the wharf on the River Lee Navigation and use the building there. Further community use will also be possible. Based in Edmonton since 1942, the Sea Cadets’ purpose is to celebrate Britain’s maritime heritage and contribute to its future development by supporting young people.

For more information, please refer to our consultation booklet

Can I take a tour of the existing facility?

The existing site runs tours and these have already attracted thousands of people, from local residents to international delegates.

If you would like to attend, please email info@northlondonheatandpower.london or call 0208 489 3940.

What about the planning process?

What is the planning process for the project?

To ensure a replacement facility is built and up-and-running by 2025, we needed to begin planning in 2014.

The replacement facility will generate over 50 megawatts of electricity. This means in planning terms it is classified as a Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project. As a result, it was the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy that made the decision to grant consent to build it, following examination of our proposals. The consent that was granted is known as a Development Consent Order (DCO).

You can view a timeline of the project by clicking here.

You can also visit the Planning Inspectorate’s website for information about the Development Consent Order process. http://infrastructure.planningportal.gov.uk/

 

 

 

Who would give consent for a new facility?

Who gave consent for a new facility?

A Development Consent Order application was granted in February 2017 by the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

The Secretary of State made the decision based on the examining authority’s report, which you can find on the Planning Inspectorate’s website.

For a full description of what happens, please see our diagram in our consultation booklet.

You can also visit the Planning Inspectorate’s website for information about the Development Consent Order process at infrastructure.planningportal.gov.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Is the Project in line with Government policy?

The Government’s National Policy Statements provide the basis for decisions on applications received on Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects. The application for the Development Consent Order must follow the guidance in the following National Policy Statements:

  • EN-1 Overarching National Policy Statement for Energy

  • EN-3 National Policy Statement for Renewable Energy Infrastructure

The EcoPark is well placed to continue to provide a sustainable solution for dealing with waste.

Enfield Council’s Supplementary Planning Document which focuses on the site supports the decommissioning of the existing plant at the Edmonton EcoPark and the continued use of the site for waste management. The Supplementary Planning Document also promotes the ongoing use of the site to manage waste and generate heat and power.

The Mayor of London’s policies protect existing waste sites such as the EcoPark and promote the management of London’s waste within its boundaries as well as the generation of energy in London.

Find out more on the relevant planning policy documents 

Tell me about the consultation

Who did you consult with?

Our Statement of Community Consultation set out how we planned to carry out our consultation in the period in which we were preparing our DCO application.  The Statement of Community Consultation was prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 47 of the Planning Act 2008, and was subject to consultation with Enfield Council, the host borough for our project.  You can view our consultation summary report here to find out more about the consultation.

You can view our Statement of Community Consultation here

What happened in the first phase of consultation?

We held our first phase of consultation between 28 November 2014 and 27 January 2015. We asked for your thoughts on our proposals so we could then shape the details of our application.

The feedback we have received played an essential part in shaping our plans for the replacement facility. The topics you commented on covered many areas including:

• the need for the project

• the design and appearance of the replacement facility and chimney stack

• landscaping

• environment

• the cooling system

• traffic and transport

• community benefits

• the consultation process itself.

At the public exhibitions, attendees asked a range of interesting questions including some about the existing plant. For example, we have been asked about the existing composting centre to the north of the energy from waste plant.  We can confirm that there are no plans for a composting centre as part of our Development Consent Order.

You also asked about the cooling system. You said you would welcome any increased efficiency and you did understand that the plume was only water vapour.

The written comments you provided have been summarised by theme along with our responses. This can be read in our feedback report for phase one.

What happened during the second phase of consultation?

We held our second phase of consultation from 18 May to 30 June 2015. We asked for your thoughts on our detailed proposals before we submitted them to the Planning Inspectorate. 

We have reviewed your consultation responses and have produced a summary of the further consultation report, a copy of the draft consultation report can also be found here.

What is a Statement of Community Consultation?

Our Statement of Community Consultation sets out how we will consult in the period in which we are preparing our application. It has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 47 of the Planning Act 2008, and was subject to consultation with Enfield Council, the host borough of our application.

Our Statement of Community Consultation is available here.

How do I comment on the proposals?

Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the consultation have now finished.

Hello! Our two planned phases of consultation have now finished. We have reviewed all of the feedback we received during both phases of the consultation and have produced a summary of the consultation report.

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If you have any questions please call 0208 489 3940 or email info@northlondonheatandpower.london

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